Saturday, May 9, 2015

In Righty PanderFest, Jeb even with Walker

For those of you who think Jeb Bush is somehow the anti-Walker, read through these tidbits in Mike Allen's report today to see how closely he's following Walker's Iowa/Southern strategy narrative:


JEB BUSH'S REMARKS today at Liberty University commencement in Lynchburg, Va., where he quoted C.S. Lewis and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and was introduced by President Jerry Falwell Jr., son of university's founder: "My Dad thought very highly of your father ... and knew him as a loyal friend. Jerry Falwell had a gift for friendship, spoke to everyone, and turned his back on no one. ... Whatever the need, the affliction, or the injustice, there is no more powerful or liberating influence on this earth than the Christian conscience in action. How strange, in our own time, to hear Christianity spoken of as some sort of backward and oppressive force. ...

"[I]t's a depressing fact that when some people think of Christianity and of Judeo-Christian values, they think of something static, narrow, and outdated. ... [T]hat sure isn't how it reads in the original. Offhand, I cannot think of any more subversive moral idea ever loosed on the world than 'the last shall be first, and the first last.' Likewise, is it really just some time-worn, pre-modern idea that God's favor is upon the gentle, the kind, and the poor in spirit? ...

"It's a voice like no other, whether it is captured on scrolls and paper, or in bits of data; seen in the example of Francis the saint, or of Francis the pope; affirmed by the witness of ancient martyrs, or by the witness of martyrs dying in His name today. No place where the message reaches, no heart that it touches, is ever the same again. ... Your generation is bringing the Christian voice to where it ... sometimes isn't heard enough. ...

"I am asked ... whether I would ever allow my decisions in government to be influenced by my Christian faith. ... The simple and safe reply is, 'No. Never. Of course not.' If the game is political correctness, that's the answer that moves you to the next round. The endpoint is a certain kind of politician we've all heard before - the guy whose moral convictions are so private ... that he refuses even to impose them on himself. ...

"I don't know about you, but I'm betting that when it comes to doing the right and good thing, the Little Sisters of the Poor know better than the regulators at the Department of Health and Human Services. From the standpoint of religious freedom, you might even say it's a choice between the Little Sisters and Big Brother - and I'm going with the Sisters. That case continues, and as usual the present administration is supporting the use of coercive federal power."

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

There is no difference between Jeb (not his real name) and Scott Walker. In fact, reasonable people may believe that the purpose of these 2 candidates is to believe the same neocon interests behind George WALKER Bush take control of the White House in 2016.

And does everyone remember the controversies of the 2000 & 2004 elections?

Walker and Bush may take jabs at each other through the primaries, like when Scott Walker talks about "names from the past" and proclaims himself a "name from the future", but they will not challenge each other on policies, flip-flops, or even the criminality they share. Between them and the rest of the clown car, they ensure that GOP talking points are in the media.

When the convention rolls around, not even Scott walker is dumb enough to put a Bush on the ticket as VP. Remember what happened to Reagan with George Herbert WALKER was VP?

Jeb, however, may decide he can solidify his standing with teabaggers by putting Walker on the ticket, but this means we won't see the Cheney/Bush model. Walker, as VP, cannot be the brains of the president.

So regardless of which is on the top of the ticket and whether or not the other is VP, expect the GOP republican nominee to take their marching orders from the Koch brothers.

my5cents said...

Jeb Bush accused the Obama administration of using "coercive federal power" to infringe on the religious rights of Americans during a commencement speech at Liberty University in Virginia.

I said that religious freedom doesn't mean you get to force your beliefs onto others. That when women are not free to make their own decisions regarding childbirth or birth control, you are denying them their rights. Jeb said, "Wherever women and girls in other countries are brutally exploited, or treated as possessions without rights and dignity, we Christians see that arrogance for what it is." I said that when you treat women as possessions without the rights and dignity to make their own health decisions in this country, then that's okay? Isn't that just as arrogant?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/05/09/jeb-bush-religious-freedom_n_7247922.html?fb_comment_id=899944086715068_899956836713793&comment_id=899956836713793#f34aa6f5

Raven said...

It actually sounds like they are competing for "Dominionist cred" — which of them would most credibly put Christian Dominionism into effect over this nation if elected President?